How to Embrace Transitions with Minimal Damage

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In both professional and personal environments it can be very difficult to embrace and include others in a timely manner. For some, it’s incredibly easy to embrace and understand other’s points of views, for many it can very difficult. There are many ways to smooth a transition and get to know teams before damaging relationships and preventing a smooth transition. Here are my views on How to Embrace Transitions with Minimal Damage:

  • Don’t have any preconceived ideas and visions of the other party. If you walk in thinking a certain way, you’re going to struggle to have an open mind about the reality. It’s okay to be educated and prepared to question for understanding, but don’t use labels until you have the opportunity to collaborate.
  • It’s a lot of fun to point out opportunities of others, but doing it too quickly can be beyond damaging. I recommend seeking feedback about your own opportunities; if the other team invites your perspective (which they usually do); you are free to share at that time.
  • Dig for strengths of the other team. I recommend this not only for relationship building, but I promise you each team and individual brings something to the table.
  • When others ask you specific personal questions; respond, and then ask them the same question. Other’s inquiries are often open invitations to sharing something they care about themselves.
  • Be authentic with your intentions of strengthening your team otherwise people will see right through your true feelings.
  • Find a strong mixture of both professional and personal-professional questions to enhance trust within the group.
  • Question the other team on what you can do to continue supporting and building your relationship together.
  • Make sure you introduce yourself to as many people as possible and learn the names and roles of these individuals.
  • Follow-up with those you met with a personal e-mail or phone call expressing your appreciation for your conversation.

Whether your families are merging, teams are working together, or you get a new leader, embracing these transitions are very important. Try to remember that each person has a value; make it your mission to find these values and grow a relationship based on them.

Develop daily,

Michael Dooley

leaderdevelopmentblog.com
T-https://twitter.com/MdooleyBlog
F-https://www.facebook.com/leaderdevelopmentblog
 
Questions: I didn’t even scratch the surface – what other ways can you share to grow unity?
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3 thoughts on “How to Embrace Transitions with Minimal Damage

  1. A very informative post and great advice. I’ve crunched it down to seven (apparently that’s the memory-magic-number, as anything more and we lose the plot 😉 )

    •Always keep an open mind. Listen first. Question later.
    •Focus on what you are required to do before making suggesting to others, and do so only when asked.
    •There is always something new to learn and someone to learn it from.
    •Reciprocate, whether at a personal or professional level.
    •Don’t fake it. Find something you truly care about and make that your project.
    •We spend most of our time working, so work on boding with those you work with. Start by knowing their names and roles.
    •Communication (both in person and virtual) is key to building and sustaining mutually beneficial relationships.

    All the best,
    Vic

      • Very glad you liked it. I’m afraid I’ve had to do so much synthesising for my own work that it’s become second nature.
        You article is great, has many useful tips, and I am sure many will find it helpful.

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